Academy Sports is buckling to political pressure, even though they had nothing to do with the Orlando terror attack.

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They are removing from shelves and displays all “MSRs” (modern sporting rifles such as the AR), all MSR accessories, and any firearm the resembles a MSR (like a S&W M&P15-22). So they are removing mags, rails, and Magpul stocks form shelves as well. But they will still sell the MSRs on line and presumably in store. Soooo, they won’t display them or advertise them, but they will sell them. Hypocritical.

In response Daniel Defense is refusing to sell rifles or gear through Academy. By pulling this stunt, Academy is not helping the Second Amendment. The Turd in Orlando had Glock on him during the attack, as well as a Smith and Wesson .38 in his car… Yet the Glock and Revolvers remain on display at Academy Sports.

Consider that when spending your cash.

Neil Steinberg claims unfair denial in an attempt to buy a rifle

A Chicago area “journalist,” Neil Steinberg, tries to buy a rifle in Illinois and his purchase is denied. Steinberg claims the denial occurs because he’s part of the media and therefore gun guys won’t sell to him. The dealer says they denied the purchase because Steinberg has a history of chemical dependency and a documented history of domestic violence. The “Cliff Notes” version is, they are both right.

In his article with the Chicago Sun Times, Steinberg lays out the events that led up to the decision to buy a gun. A classic media stunt even by Steinberg’s own admission, meant to highlight how “easy” it is to do such a thing. Steinberg’s plans went to awry when the gun store called him back the day after he made his purchase saying the sale had been denied and his money returned. After a short while, the dealer said they denied Steinberg’s purchase because of a history of chemical dependence and domestic violence. That’s a pretty serious allegation that Steinberg deflects and never addresses in his article. Instead, he implies the standard the dealer used is unfair yet asserts such a standard should have been applied to the shooter in Orlando.

Such a standard was applied in Orlando. A dealer claiming a man matching the shooter’s description, says they not only denied the man’s intended purchase of a rifle and ammunition, they notified the FBI about it. Nothing happened. He didn’t raise any suspicion with the next dealer and he’d passed the required background checks to be a security guard and a possess license to carry which, in many states, negates the background check phone call at the point of sale. Keep in mind that any dealer can deny a purchase to anyone for any reason. After being denied, Steinberg never entertains the possibility that his own very public past might cause any licensed dealer who knows his name to be resistant to sell anything to him or anyone they reasonably suspect probably shouldn’t be able to buy a gun.

The past Steinberg fails to address isn’t exactly some mild, momentary indiscretion. A quick search indicates he once wrote a book called, “Drunkard: “A Hard-Drinking Life,” which is billed on GoodReads.com as, “An extraordinarily honest memoir about the life of a functioning alcoholic and the realities of recovery from a veteran columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times.” Not lightweight stuff, folks. So we have a person who admittedly has an chemical dependency issue. It’s one thing to abuse the drug of your choice. Quite another for that to spill into abusing your family.

According to the Chicago Tribune, late one October night in 2005, Steinberg’s wife tried to call the police to make a report of abuse. We don’t know the details of what led her to make that call. But, Steinberg knocked the phone out of her hands with sufficient force to cause minor injuries in an attempt to prevent her from making said call Steinberg’s wife made the call from another phone. As a result, Steinberg was arrested and charged with one count of domestic battery and one count of interfering with the reporting of domestic battery. A month later, his wife apparently went to Cook County prosecutors and said she no longer felt endangered by him. And like that, “Poof!”…the charges were dropped. He was allowed to undergo private counseling/treatment and move on with his life.

Is it possible the dealer just decided they’d rather not give Steinberg ammunition for his story? Sure. But it is also quite likely that, given recent events and the fact this specific man’s arrest for domestic battery made the local news, that they didn’t want to risk being the latest dealer to be lambasted for selling a gun to a man with a “known” history of domestic abuse. Either way, can you really blame them?

/GM

GOTR20160605 Podcast

After months of being spread to the four winds, we’ve once again managed to get the band together again. We want to thank all of your for your patience and support. We’re doing our best to get back in the saddle and return to regularly recording shows going forward. For now, enjoy this long awaited edition of the GOTR Podcast!

-GOTR

This is Mary Fields, not Harriet Tubman you ignorant asses!!!

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Meet “Stagecoach” Mary Fields (1832-1914), the first African American mail carrier (male or female) in the United States

Mary Fields began her life as a slave in Tennessee in 1832, the exact date is unknown. Mary’s mother Susanna was the personal servant to the plantation owner’s wife, Mrs. Dunnes. The plantation wife also had a daughter who was born within two weeks of Mary, and named Dolly. Mrs. Dunne allowed the children to play together. Over the years Mary was taught to read and write and the two girls became best friends. At sixteen, Dolly was sent to boarding school in Ohio and Mary was left all alone.

Mary’s father worked in the fields on the Dunnes’ farm. He was sold after Mary was born. Mary’s mother wanted her daughter to have a last name, so since her father Buck worked in the fields, her mother decided her last name should be Fields. So thus Mary Fields came to be. After Mary’s mother passed away, Mary became the head of the household at the young age of fourteen.

After Dolly went away to boarding school, The Civil War began. The slaves were left to fend for themselves. It was during this time that she learned many life survival skills. She learned how to garden, raise chickens and practice medicine with natural herbs.

Around the age of 30 Mary heard from her dear friend Dolly. Dolly was now a nun and was renamed Sister Amadaus. The Sister asked Mary to join her at a convent in Ohio. Mary immediately began her twenty-day trip from Tennessee to Ohio. Mary remained with the Ursuline Sisters for many years – even when Dolly relocated to the St. Peter’s Mission in Montana. Mary never married and she had no children. The nuns were her family. She protected the nuns.

Mary wanted to follow her friend to Montana, but was told it was too remote and rustic. However, that all changed when Mother Amadaus became ill with pneumonia and wrote to Mary asking for her support and healing. Mary wasted no time and departed for Montana by stagecoach in 1885. At 53 years old Mary started her new life in Montana. Mary helped nurse Mother Amadaus back to health. The sisters were all in amazement of this tough black woman. Mary was no stranger to rolling a cigar, shooting guns and drinking whiskey. She grew fresh vegetables that were enjoyed by the Sisters and the surrounding community. Mary was forced to leave her beloved mission and the Sisters after a shooting incident. Mary shot in self-defense, and was found innocent, but had to find a new home.

Wells Fargo had the mail contract during that time and was looking for someone for the Great Falls to Fort Benton route to deliver the U.S. Mail. It was a rough and rugged route and would require a person of strong will and great survival skills to maneuver the snowy roads and high winds. Mary immediately applied at the ripe age of 60 years old. It was rumored that she could hitch a team of horses faster than the boys half her age and due to her toughness, she was hired! Mary became the first African American mail carrier in the United States and the second woman. Mary was proud of the fact that her stage was never held up. Mary and her mule Moses, never missed a day and it was during this time that she earned the nickname of “Stagecoach,” for her unfailing reliability.

The townspeople adopted Mary as one of their own. They celebrated her birthday twice a year since she didn’t know the exact date of her real birthday. Mary Fields was known as Black Mary and Stagecoach Mary. She was considered an eccentric even in these modern times. She was six feet tall and over 200 pounds. By the time she was well known in Central Montana, she had a pet eagle, a penchant for whiskey, baseball (which was a new sport at the time) and a heart as big as the gun she was famous for carrying. Mary wore a buffalo skin dress that she made herself – you might say she drew attention wherever she went – even in a small western pioneer town. Mary was a local celebrity and her legend and tales of her adventures were known by surrounding communities and neighboring states.

Gary Cooper (the actor) had his mail delivered by Mary as a young boy in Cascade County. As an adult, Cooper wrote an article about her for Ebony Magazine in 1955 in which he wrote, “Born a slave somewhere in Tennessee, Mary lived to become one of the freest souls ever to draw a breath, or a .38.” He also wrote of her kindness and his admiration for her. The famous western artists Charlie Russell drew a sketch of her. It was a pen and ink sketch of a mule kicking over a basket of eggs with Mary looking none to happy.

Mary retired her post in 1901 and passed away in 1914. She is buried at Highland Cemetery at St. Peter’s Mission. Her grave is marked with a simple cross.